Home

Monthly Meetings

Links

Board Resources

About

Site Map

Hall of Fame
About
Board of Directors

About the St. Louis City LEPC


What is an "LEPC"?

Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPCs) are appointed by State Emergency Response Commissions (SERCs). The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986 (SARA Title II) requires all 50 states and U.S. Territories to set up a state SERC. The SERCs ere established to ensure that all states’ emergency response programs are integrated with federal laws. SERCs and LEPCs work together with government agencies (such as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), local Community Advisory Panels (CAPs), chemical companies, and various groups involved in emergency response, to educated the general public, law enforcement, and first responders about the safe handling of chemicals; better known as product stewardship.


Who is on the LEPC?

The St. Louis City Local Emergency Planning Committee is a group of volunteer representatives drawn from the community including: emergency responders, law enforcement, industry, government, hospitals, schools, media, and concerned citizens.

What does the LEPC do?

LEPC members represent their communities and serve as resources for citizens to learn about hazardous substances, emergency planning, as well as health and environmental risks in their neighborhoods.

What is the LEPC's Mission?

The mission of the St. Louis Local Emergency Planning Committee is to promote safety in the community thru hazardous materials awareness, supporting planning efforts, encouraging cooperative partnerships between the community and industry, and developing and sponsoring educational and training programs relative to hazardous materials and situations for St. Louis, Emergency Responders, Industry, and the Community.

How does the LEPC help the community?

The City of St. Louis Local Emergency Planning Commission (LEPC) acts as a coordinator for emergency preparedness planning in the City of St. Louis and exists to help coordinate, plan, prepare and train for disasters especially hazardous materials (HAZMAT) spills. The LEPC provides the public with right-to-know information regarding the chemicals, the quantity, the location and the risk to the community. The City of St. Louis LEPC brings together businesses, the fire department, police department, hospitals and other agencies to help the community prepare for and prevent disasters.

How does the LEPC share information?

The LEPC shares information with the community by inviting citizens and business representatives to attend LEPC meetings and share comments / concerns during the “Public Comments” portion of the meeting. The LEPC takes the following additional steps to assist the public as an information resource:

  • Distributing information regarding individual / family preparedness

  • Providing chemical spill data to contractors on properties subject to construction and / or renovation.
     
  • Training facility managers to properly prepare Tier II (chemical inventory) Reports.
  • Sending out “Are You Ready” information for individual / family preparedness.
What can I do to help?

Here are some ways you can help make St. Louis a safer community in which to live:

  • Take an interest in chemicals located in your community.

  • Volunteer to assist your Local Emergency Planning Committee. Contact the St. Louis Emergency Management director at (314) 613-7232.

  • If you own a business, take an inventory of your hazardous chemicals. Determine whether you need to report. Contact the Missouri Emergency Response Commission at 1-800-780-1014 to obtain forms.

  • Let your fire department know about hazardous chemicals you have on hand even if you don’t have a large enough quantity that you are required to report.

  • Shop carefully when you buy products containing hazardous substances. Buy only the amount you need and use the product according to directions on the label.

  • Talk with local facilities if you have concerns about how chemicals are handled. Good communication can prevent many problems.

  • Make sure local officials are aware of your support for programs to manage hazardous chemicals properly.


Home
Monthly Meetings
Links
Board Resources
About
Site Map
Hall of Fame